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PACKAGES

Our mission is to connect visitors to the Darien with local artisan groups that are already working to develop ecotourism in their communities. While every village and adventure will be unique, any of the villages that you visit will provide you with comfortable accommodations that include lodging in traditional Embera guest houses, bedding with mosquito nets, and modern bathrooms.

Once you decide which community you would like to visit we can begin designing a visit that will be customized designed for your schedule, budget and appetite for adventure.

 
 

el camino

 
 
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DESCRIPTION

This is the true Darien experience, one for those who know that the journey is not all about the destination.

With local guides experience the jungle as the Embera people have been for generations. An endless combination of trails can take you up the Rio Sambu as you head to Pavarando, the last community at the river's headwaters. Or follow the Rio Santa Rosa to its source, the jungle pass that takes you through the ecological layers of the Sapo Mountain Range before dropping down to Playa Muerto on the Pacific coast. Camp out in the jungle along the way or experience a night in the home of a family from this unique and mystical region of the world.

All treks can be tailored to your time frame and comfort level. Activities along the way can include: spear fishing in the rivers, classes on native plants and their traditional uses, cultural presentations and, of course, home cooked meals with local dishes and fruits freshly harvested from the local communities. 

 

activities

  • Guided hikes to waterfalls and swimming holes
  • Presentation of embera artisan work
  • Hike through old-growth forest.

 

 

pijibasal

 
 
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DESCRIPTION

Pijibasal is a small indigenous community of the Embera ethnic group, located in the foothills of the Pirre mountain, Darien National Park. The community is dedicated to subsistence agriculture, the conservation of biodiversity and the rescue of their ancestral culture. Come for a visit to rest, swim, hike, interact with nature or simply live for a few days learning the ways of the Embera: learn the art of basket weaving and wood carving, make natural dyes, cultive the land and taste the traditional dishes from the Embera kitchen.

 

activities

  • Guided hikes to waterfalls and swimming holes
  • Presentation of embera artisan work
  • Hike through old-growth forest.

Extra activities

  • Take an overnight hike to the famous cerro Pirre, the 5,400 ft. mountain that is the entrance to the Darien National Park.

 

 
 

 

playa muerto

 

DESCRIPTION

 A century ago the first Embera families arrived to the beach at the mouth of the Rio Playa Muerto and settled down to form a community. Then, in the 1950's, outside loggers and rubber collectors came to extract the areas of its rare hardwoods like mahogany, cocobolo and other native species.. This created jobs and the handful of houses blossomed into a village. Worried by the environmental degradation caused by the logging, the Darien Nation Park was created in 1980 and named an Unesco World Heritage site. This move was welcomed by the Embera for defending the forest that sustained them. Unfortunately, it also meant the end of the income that they community needed to develop.

Sine then the communities has grown to 34 houses and and 107 people. Today its inhabitants are dedicated to fishing, artisan work, and farming the land. Its remote location and difficult access have allowed the Embera to continue practicing the customs and traditions of the generations that came before them, but this has also inhibited access to jobs and income for community members. 

Come not only to learn about the area’s history but also to be a part of developing its future. Ecotourism helps provide the Embera people not only the opportunity to share their culture and love of the natural world around them, but also the ability to be work as wardens of their environment from which they live. With no local employment available nor an accessible market where they could sell their crops, the community of Playa Muerto has been sustained through the years by the occasional cruise ship or trekking tour coming to spend a few hours or days in the tranquility of the beach-side paradise. The modest income gained by the community’s guesthouse and the sales of artisan work have allowed for more of the village’s youth to return from working abroad to take part in the growth of the community.


 

    activities

    • The waterfall
    • Hike to the Casa de Tulivieja
    • Spearfishing in the river
    • Swim in the lagoon

     

    Extra activities

    • Fishing trips along the coast
    • Visit to the nest of the Harpy Eagle, Panama's national bird
    • Cultural Presentation
    caminante-1-11.jpg
     

    DESCRIPTION

     A century ago the first Embera families arrived to the beach at the mouth of the Rio Playa Muerto and settled down to form a community. Then, in the 1950's, outside loggers and rubber collectors came to extract the areas of its rare hardwoods like mahogany, cocobolo and other native species.. This created jobs and the handful of houses blossomed into a village. Worried by the environmental degradation caused by the logging, the Darien Nation Park was created in 1980 and named an Unesco World Heritage site. This move was welcomed by the Embera for defending the forest that sustained them. Unfortunately, it also meant the end of the income that they community needed to develop.

    Sine then the communities has grown to 34 houses and and 107 people. Today its inhabitants are dedicated to fishing, artisan work, and farming the land. Its remote location and difficult access have allowed the Embera to continue practicing the customs and traditions of the generations that came before them, but this has also inhibited access to jobs and income for community members. 

    Come not only to learn about the area’s history but also to be a part of developing its future. Ecotourism helps provide the Embera people not only the opportunity to share their culture and love of the natural world around them, but also the ability to be work as wardens of their environment from which they live. With no local employment available nor an accessible market where they could sell their crops, the community of Playa Muerto has been sustained through the years by the occasional cruise ship or trekking tour coming to spend a few hours or days in the tranquility of the beach-side paradise. The modest income gained by the community’s guesthouse and the sales of artisan work have allowed for more of the village’s youth to return from working abroad to take part in the growth of the community.

     

    activities

    • The waterfall
    • Hike to the Casa de Tulivieja
    • Spearfishing in the river
    • Swim in the lagoon

     

    Extra activities

    • Fishing trips along the coast
    • Visit to the nest of the Harpy Eagle, Panama's national bird
    • Cultural Presentation

     

     
     

     

    mogue

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    DESCRIPTION

    Mogue is located in bay of San Miguel. Just an hour by boat from the provincial capital of La Palma. It is a treasure trove of Embera culture and lays within the Punta Patiño Private Nature Reserve. This is the perfect destination for those who really want to immerse themselves in Embera culture and tradition.

     

     

    activities

    • Spearfishing in the river

     

    Extra activities

    • Fishing trips along the coast
    • Cultural Presentation

     

     

    la chunga

     
     
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    DESCRIPTION

    La Chunga....

     

    activities

    • Guided hikes to waterfalls and swimming holes
    • Presentation of embera artisan work
    • Hike through old-growth forest.

    Extra activities